CAPE FLATTERY WASHINGTON STATE

The furthest northwest tip of the contiguous United State, Cape Flattery provides a dramatic backdrop to a surprisingly accessible hike.


It's managed by the Makah Tribe, who provide permits for parking here at Washburn's General Store, The Makah Museum, and many other locations in Neah Bay.


As you drive through on the way to the trailhead, be sure to purchase yours -- they're good for the year, and you can also use it for Shi Shi Beach.

THE QUILEUTE TRIBE AT 1ST BEACH LA PUSH WASHINGTON

The Quileute Tribe is located in La Push, Washington, on the shores of the Pacific Ocean. 


The Quileute Tribe has lived and hunted in this area for thousands of years. Although the village of La Push is only about one square mile, the Tribe’s original territory stretched along the shores of the Pacific from the glaciers of Mount Olympus to the rivers of the rain forests.

FORKS, WASHINGTON VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER

Make plans to stop by for information on: Twilight sites, Hoh Rain Forest, Pacific Ocean Beaches, Waterfall Trail, lodging, restaurants, shops and activities like fishing, kayaking, biking, hiking, camping and much more.


FORKS, WASHINGTON LOGGER MEMORIAL

On the morning of May 1, 1943, Simon Erickson, of Forks, and his cutting partner Louis Johnson, of Port Angeles, set out to do their jobs as timber fallers for the Ozette Timber Company.

HOH RAIN FOREST OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK WASHINGTON STATE

The Hoh Rain Forest is located in the stretch of the Pacific Northwest rainforest which once spanned the Pacific coast from southeastern Alaska to the central coast of California.


The Hoh is one of the finest remaining examples of temperate rainforest in the United States and is one of the park's most popular destinations.

FORKS WASHINGTON

A 4 Minute Trip Through Forks - A Small Town In Northwest Washington State On The Edge Of The Olympic National Forest.

FORKS WASHINGTON TIMBER MUSEUM

HERITAGE OF THE PAST PRESERVED FOR THE FUTURE


In the late 1870's, non-Indian settlers of Forks Prairie came by way of rivers and trails from the Pacific and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, as the overland route from the east was nearly impenetrable forest.  Trails were the main means of travel for early settlers along the coast and in the interior Olympic Peninsula.  The life of a settler was tedious.  "Proving up" on their homestead claims was a primary goal since improvements were required...